Type 2 diabetes has emerged as a significant chronic condition in Australia, and many other developed nations.

With a low Glycemic Index (GI), and low Glycemic Load (GL), BARLEYmax™ wholegrain has two of the key properties for the management and prevention of type 2 diabetes.

Glycemic index

Diet management, in particular the management of Glycemic Index (GI) and Glycemic Load (GL), is recognised as key to both the management and prevention of type 2 diabetes.

Studies have shown that diets that have a high glycemic load are associated with an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and certain cancers.1

Resistant starch and insulin sensitivity

Increasing your wholegrain consumption has been shown to reduce the risk of diabetes by 20-30%.

BARLEYmax™ not only features significantly lower GI and GL than standard barley, it also has high levels of resistant starch. Resistant starch helps to maintain blood sugar levels by increasing the body’s sensitivity to insulin.

Lower GI than regular barley

According to a 2002 study2 choosing low-GI foods in place of conventional or high-GI foods has a useful effect on medium-term glycemic control in patients with diabetes. The benefits of low-GI foods are similar to those offered by pharmacological agents that also target postprandial hyperglycemia.

A recent study that compared breakfast cereal made with BARLEYmax™ to standard barley, showed a significantly lower rise in blood insulin levels.

BARLEYmax glycemic index comparison

Manage Diabetes

monounsaturated and
polyunsaturated fats

Type 2 diabetes has emerged as a significant chronic condition in Australia, and many other developed nations.

With a low Glycemic Index (GI), and low Glycemic Load (GL), BARLEYmax™ wholegrain has two of the key properties for the management and prevention of type 2 diabetes.

Did you know?

Studies have shown that diets with a high glycemic load are independently associated with an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and certain cancers.

Choosing low-GI foods in place of conventional or high-GI foods has a small but clinically useful effect on medium-term glycemic control in patients with diabetes. The incremental benefit is similar to that offered by pharmacological agents that also target postprandial hyperglycemia.